Orange County Land Trust hosts guided hike at Fuller Mountain Preserve on Sept. 28

Warwick. Fuller Mountain Preserve is one of Orange County’s best kept secrets. The overlook at the terminal point of the Orange Trail bears striking resemblance to the site of a 1872 painting by Jasper Cropsey, Hudson River School painter and nearby Greenwood Lake resident.

17 Sep 2019 | 01:35

Naturalist Gary Keeton will lead a guided hike to the scenic overlook at Fuller Mountain Preserve on Saturday, Sept. 28, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., where participants will enjoy views of the Warwick Valley, Sugar Loaf Mountain and the Shawangunk Ridge.

Along the way, learn about the preserve’s natural and historical significance. Easy to moderate hike with brief stops throughout the event.

A donation of $5 per-person is suggested to help support the mission of the Orange County Land Trust.

Pre-registration is required: E-mail Jeremy@OCLT.org or call 845-534-3690 ext. 18 to reserve a spot/s.

On its web site, The Orange County Land Trust describes the preserve thusly:

This magnificent 255-acre wooded ravine on Fuller Mountain in Warwick stretches from north of Black Rock Road to the New Jersey border. Fuller Mountain Preserve is one of Orange County’s best kept secrets. The overlook at the terminal point of the Orange Trail bears striking resemblance to the site of a 1872 painting by Jasper Cropsey, Hudson River School painter and nearby Greenwood Lake resident.

A stream called Fuller’s Brook runs the length of the preserve. Frogs, toads and salamanders live in the wetlands around the stream. The woods are home to many mammals, including the long-tailed weasel and black bear, several unusual plants, and an abundance of bird life. The preserve has a small parking area and information kiosk with maps of the preserve’s three trails: a moderate 1.75 mile round trip trail and 1.5 mile round trip trail that both lead to a fantastic vista overlooking the Warwick Valley and an enchanting .75 mile loop that meanders along and over Fuller’s Brook.

The Orange County Land Trust also owns and manages several nature preserves that are open to the public for quiet, passive recreation. For more information visit www.oclt.org.