The Goshen Art League has scheduled simultaneous online auctions

Goshen. People can bid on painted trotters and painted roof tiles from the Goshen Music Hall’s roof from Oct. 24th to Oct. 30th.

12 Oct 2020 | 02:20

The Goshen Art League scheduled the trotters auction online at their website from Oct 24th to Oct 30th.

The trotters auction happens simultaneously with a sister auction of painted roof tiles from the Goshen Music Hall, also online at Goshen Art League’s web page.

After tossing back and forth the idea of doing the trotters auction in person or virtually, the Goshen Art League opted to move the auction and the bidding online.

Robb Gomulka, president of the Goshen Art League, put together the page on the league’s website, with bidding entirely online, said Carly Glasse, president of Illuminate Goshen.

Once fully live, the trotter auction will be at www.trottersofgoshen.com.

Up on the roof

The rooftop hand painted slates auction is the brainchild of Gomulka and Gloria Bonelli, project coordinator with the art league. Gomulka and Bonelli took the old roof tiles from the Goshen Music hall and invited artists to paint them. The roof tiles (slates) auction will be held at the exact same time as the trotters’ auction at Goshenartleague.com. The slates will be up for auction at www.goshenartleague.com/slates-temp-page.html

The trotters auction runs from Saturday, Oct 24, at noon (when that portion of the website will officially go live) until 7 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 30.

Following the auction, the Goshen Art League will announce the winners and contact them for payment and pickup arrangements.

“We are hopeful that this will be a smooth process that works the best for everyone,” Glasse said. “The proceeds from the auctioned trotters will be split 50/50 between the artists and Illuminate Goshen to go towards future programming. This is especially important this year since we did not solicit sponsorships due to COVID.

“We have been doing a lot of work together,” Glasse added, “and since we have been experiencing the same COVID-related difficulties with holding events, this seemed like the best way to go about it.”